Sometimes Not Man’s Best Friend: Dog Bites

Sometimes Not Man’s Best Friend: Dog Bites

Nearly 40 percent of American homes have a dog, and while dogs may be “man’s best friend,” sometimes they bite, and sometimes with serious consequences. An expert who has studied dog bites discusses the reality of breed temperament, especially when children are around, how to prevent bites, and whether breeds with dangerous reputations deserve them.

Injuries In Senior Citizens

Injuries In Senior Citizens

A new study shows that people over age 70 are three times more likely than younger people to die when they fall. Older people also take more medications with a fall risk, and which pose a risk themselves when someone taking them falls. Experts discuss these complications and why it’s important to prevent falls and other injuries.

Poor & Rural Kids In Crisis

Poor And Rural Kids In Crisis

A study by Save the Children shows on a county-by-county basis that children in poor and rural counties, especially in the south, are much less likely to survive into adulthood, and when they do, they’re often forced to become adults too soon by poverty, pregnancy, and lack of education. A Save the Children expert discusses factors that hurt children and ways they might be alleviated.

Rethinking Dementia

Rethinking Dementia

Dementia has a much wider range than most people think, and people with dementia are usually functional for years. An expert discusses the course of the disease and how life can still be positive for years before it reaches the late, debilitating stage most people think of when they hear the word “dementia.”

The Psychology of Procrastination

The Psychology of Procrastination

Most people procrastinate at least now and then. But when we put something off, we’re usually facing not a time management problem, but an emotion management problem. Experts discuss what’s going on in our heads when we procrastinate.

Marfan Syndrome

Marfan Syndrome

Marfan syndrome produces obvious physical symptoms such as extreme height, but its hidden symptoms, especially in the heart and eyes, can be much more serious. Experts discuss its diagnosis and treatment.

Refineries And Their Neighbors: How Safe Is The Air?

Refineries And Their Neighbors: How Safe Is The Air?

A recent report shows that more than a dozen refineries around the US are emitting benzene pollution into the air at higher levels than allowed by the EPA. An activist discusses this newly labeled problem and what the agency can do to curb it.

Tasty Food vs. Healthy Food: Finding A Balance

Tasty Food vs. Healthy Food: Finding A Balance

Many Americans believe that healthy food doesn’t taste good, and tasty food isn’t healthy. A chef who is also a cardiologist discusses how to find a balance by seeking out healthy ingredients rather than whole categories of foods.

Clinical Trials And Trust In Underserved Communities

Clinical Trials And Trust In Underserved Communities

People of color are less likely than others to receive timely treatment for medical issues. This is reflected in Covid-19 vaccination numbers, in cancer treatment, and in clinical trial participation. Experts discuss ways to increase participation, especially in clinical trials that might ultimately raise trust in medicine.

Covid And Kidney Disease

Covid And Kidney Disease

Covid-19 is usually a respiratory disease, but it can affect virtually any organ in the body. The nation’s top kidney disease expert discusses how Covid can prompt life-threatening kidney effects in the previously healthy, and how those with kidney disease are more susceptible to severe Covid infection.

The Changing Face Of Colon Cancer

The Changing Face Of Colon Cancer

Colon cancer is striking much younger people than it used to, leading experts to lower the age on screening recommendations. A noted colon surgeon discusses screening and treatment options, and the way COVID-19 has changed patients’ approach to getting screened.

Covid And PTSD

Covid And PTSD

Studies show that as many as a third of people who were very ill with COVID-19 later develop PTSD. Caregivers and health care workers may be afflicted as well. An expert discusses how this develops and what people can do to get better.

Brain Aneurysm Through the Eyes of a Survivor

Brain Aneurysm Through the Eyes of a Survivor

Brain aneurysms—bulging in a brain blood vessel, like an inflated balloon—affect 1 in 50 people and are generally without symptoms until they burst. This occurs in about 30,000 people per year in the US, accounting for 3-5 percent of all new strokes. Here is the story of one survivor in her own words.

Tracing COVID In Animals & Water

Tracing COVID In Animals & Water

Scientists are testing hundreds of different kinds of animals as well as waste and storm water for COVID-19, looking for reservoirs for possible mutation. They’ve learned even pets can possibly harbor the virus but probably aren’t a threat. An expert discusses how the knowledge will combat COVID variants.

The Pandemic In Historical Perspective

The Pandemic in Historical Perspective

Plagues such as COVID-19 are nothing new, and this pandemic is far from the worst the world has ever faced. A physician and historian examines COVID in comparison to other pandemics and discusses the lessons that will serve us well in the future.