• 19-41 Segment 1: Rural Maternity Units Closing

    October 13, 2019 by

    A large number of hospitals in rural areas have closed, and many more have closed their maternity units, leaving many rural mothers-to-be with no nearby place to deliver their babies or even get prenatal care. Experts discuss the financial and demographic reasons behind these closures, the danger it presents to mothers and children, and some ways to counter the risk.

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  • 19-40 Segment 1: Does Prenatal Fluoride Lower IQ?

    19-40 Segment 1: Does Prenatal Fluoride Lower IQ?

    October 6, 2019 by

    Fluoride in community drinking water has been controversial since its introduction nearly 75 years ago. A new study adds to this with evidence that pregnant women who drink fluoridated water may produce children with slightly lowered IQ. The study author and two other experts discuss what’s known and what the ramifications of the study could be for communities, for oral health, and for children.

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  • 19-39 Segment 1: Genetic Testing and Family Secrets

    September 29, 2019 by

    The availability of consumer DNA tests and databases has allowed long-hidden family secrets to be revealed, including mistaken paternity and unknown siblings. It has also taken the anonymity away from some cases of sperm donation. Two experts discuss the ethics of overturning this promised secrecy and the impact that the revelation of secrets can have on entire families.

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  • 19-39 Segment 2: Mirror Touch Synesthesia

    19-39 Segment 2: Mirror Touch Synesthesia

    September 29, 2019 by

    Dr. Joel Salinas has mirror touch synesthesia, a condition involving cross-wiring in the brain. The result is that visual stimuli prompt a response in his touch system. He literally feels it when people experience pain. Salinas discusses how this strange condition works and how he is able to use it in diagnosis.

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  • 19-38 Segment 1: Heat and Violence

    19-38 Segment 1: Heat and Violence

    September 22, 2019 by

    Violence increases as temperatures rise in the summer, but are higher temperatures a cause of aggression? New research shows that the answer is yes, especially in family conflict, and that poor neighborhoods bear the brunt of the relationship. Researchers discuss the synergy between poverty, heat, and aggression, and speculate that a warmer world in the future could be a more violent one.

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  • 19-38 Segment 2: Nail Biting

    September 22, 2019 by

    Nail biting is an extremely common habit, but some people bite their nails so badly and so often that they suffer damage to their hands. Experts discuss why so many of us are driven to bite our nails, what can be done to stop it, and the damage that can occur when we can’t stop.

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  • 19-37 Segment 1: Importing Canadian Drugs

    19-37 Segment 1: Importing Canadian Drugs

    September 15, 2019 by

    The Trump Administration has proposed wholesale import of drugs from Canada to ease high US prescription drug prices. But since Canada is 1/10 th the size of the US, could it supply enough drugs to make a difference? What’s more, it appears Canadians are opposed to the plan and are devising rules to stop it. Experts discuss pro’s and con’s.

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  • 19-36 Segment 1: Surviving An Active Shooter

    19-36 Segment 1: Surviving An Active Shooter

    September 8, 2019 by

    With the recent active shooter incidents in El Paso and Dayton, these incidents no longer seem rare, and experts say there’s been a shift in public perception. Now they seemingly could happen anywhere, and it’s become a public health issue. Two experts discuss the changing theory of how to survive an active shooter incident through what’s called “run, hide, and fight.”

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  • 19-35 Segment 1: Sudden Unexplained Death of a Child

    19-35 Segment 1: Sudden Unexplained Death of a Child

    September 1, 2019 by

    Each year, some 400 US children over age 1, most of them toddlers, die overnight for no known reason. Families, longing for answers, often find that their families, friends, and even pediatricians are unfamiliar with this classification of death, or that they even occur. Family members who have lost a child, a medical examiner, and a research expert who has lost a child discuss SUDC.

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  • 19-35 Segment 2: Tonsil Stones

    19-35 Segment 2: Tonsil Stones

    September 1, 2019 by

    Some people find that small “stones” are growing on their tonsils. They’re an accumulation of skin cells, food, and other debris. While they are not medically dangerous or painful, they often produce bad breath or sometimes pain. Two expert physicians discuss tonsil stones’ formation and treatment.

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  • 19-34 Segment 1: A Closer Look at Food Waste

    19-34 Segment 1: A Closer Look at Food Waste

    August 25, 2019 by

    Experts believe about 40 percent of the food available in America is thrown away. Solving this environmental problem also creates an opportunity to help with food insecurity. It starts with consumers. Experts explain where waste comes from and how people can cut down on its production.

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  • 19-34 Segment 2: Giggling Epilepsy

    19-34 Segment 2: Giggling Epilepsy

    August 25, 2019 by

    Epilepsy can show itself in many ways, including as episodes of giggling and laughing. An expert discusses the case of a then-nine-year old boy with such seizures, the danger they posed, and the novel way he was treated.

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  • 19-33 Segment 1: Copper Toxicity

    August 18, 2019 by

    High levels of copper in the body can produce mental health symptoms such as depression, anxiety, and aggression. However, most doctors don’t test for copper levels and may prescribe medications like antidepressants instead. An author who suffered years with undiagnosed copper toxicity and two expert psychiatrists discuss diagnosis and treatment.

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  • 19-32 Segment 1: The Economics of Later School Start Times

    19-32 Segment 1: The Economics of Later School Start Times

    August 11, 2019 by

    Thirty years of research have shown that teenagers’ biology prevents them from getting to sleep much before 11pm, and with most high schools starting classes around 8 am, they are chronically sleep deprived. Experts discuss how students and even the economy would benefit from later start times and the reasons many people and school districts still oppose the change.

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  • 19-32 Segment 2: Dog Breeds and Dog Bites

    August 11, 2019 by

    Nearly 40 percent of American homes have a dog, and while dogs may be “man’s best friend,” sometimes they bite, and sometimes with serious consequences. An expert who has studied dog bites discusses the reality of breed temperament, especially when children are around, how to prevent bites, and whether breeds with dangerous reputations deserve them.

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  • 19-31 Segment 1: TBI’s, Personality Change, and Marriage

    August 4, 2019 by

    Traumatic brain injury can profoundly change the injured in personality and temperament, as well as physically and cognitively. Spouses bear the brunt of these changes to the point many feel like they’re living with a stranger. Two experts and the spouse of a TBI victim discuss the many ways life changes after an injury and what can help to get them through the ordeal.

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  • 19-31 Segment 2: School Crossing Safety

    August 4, 2019 by

    With the school year approaching, drivers need to be aware of children in crosswalks—and away from them. However, increasing distractions for both pedestrians and drivers sometimes make that difficult. A safety expert and a veteran school crossing guard—the nation’s “favorite crossing guard”– discuss.

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  • 19-30 Segment 2: A Radical Diet to Prevent Heart Disease

    July 28, 2019 by

    Heart disease is the number one killer in the US, but a well known cardiologist says if everyone would follow a plant-based, oil-free diet, heart disease could be eradicated. Yet many cardiologists won’t prescribe such a diet, fearing it’s so difficult to follow that it’s a prescription for defeat. Experts discuss.

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  • 19-29 Segment 1: The Pros and Cons of Mobile Health Apps

    July 21, 2019 by

    Mobile health apps are becoming very popular, though some are being shown to have little benefit. Few barriers exist to almost anyone entering the field whether they have health expertise or not. Privacy is also a concern. Experts discuss how people can protect themselves and find apps that do what they want.

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  • 19-28 Segment 1: Fatty Liver Disease: Silently Growing

    July 14, 2019 by

    Most people associate cirrhosis of the liver with heavy alcohol use. But nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, which also leads to cirrhosis, is growing rapidly, and may affect a quarter of the population. Experts discuss this silent disease and what people can do to prevent and treat it.

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  • 19-28 Segment 2: Cancer Treatment and Sex

    July 14, 2019 by

    Cancer treatment has always focused on survival. Now doctors are increasingly focusing on side effects, including the effect of treatment on sexual function and satisfaction. However, many patients are shy about bringing up their difficulties, unaware there are ways to help. One of the nation’s top experts discusses.

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  • 19-26 Segment 2: Genetic and Genomic Testing

    July 3, 2019 by

    When most of us think of genetic testing for health, we imagine tests to detect whether we’ve inherited genes that predispose us for cancer or other serious disease. But another kind of gene testing—genomic testing of tumor cells for their susceptibility to targeted treatments—is giving thousands of people hope of survival they’ve never had before. Experts discuss both genetic and genomic testing.

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  • 19-25 Segment 1: Generic Drug Safety

    June 24, 2019 by

    Since the 1980’s, almost all production of generic drugs has moved overseas, where FDA inspectors have a much tougher time making sure they’re following rules for safety. An investigative journalist describes the ways she’s found that many drugmakers cut corners, putting safety at risk, and details what consumers can do to protect themselves.

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  • 19-25 Segment 2: The State of the World’s Children

    June 24, 2019 by

    : Each year, the humanitarian organization Save the Children develops a nation-by-nation scorecard on how likely children are to grow up healthy, educated, and safe. The organization’s CEO discusses how most nations have improved the ways children are treated over the past generation, and why the US ranks 36th.

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