Medical Notes: Week of June 7, 2020

Medical Notes: Week of June 7, 2020

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of June 7, 2020 including: Researchers are working on an app with a sensor to test for COVID-19 using only a drop of saliva. Then, life was more stressful than it was 25 years ago… and for middle aged people, it’s much more stressful. Plus, A study shows that emergency room visits for children for mental health disorders has increased 60 percent of the last 10 years. And finally, a study shows that homeschooled adolescents have significantly lower abdominal strength and endurance than public school kids even though their BMI’s were the same.

Cancer Suppression: Lessons from Pachyderms

DNA mutations happen all the time in the body, but the immune system usually detects and deals with them. When the system fails, cancer results. Yet some animals, such as elephants, almost never get cancer, and scientists have learned that the elephant DNA repair system is 20 times more powerful than the human system. Experts explain how they hope to tap this knowledge.

17-34 Segment 2: Multitasking: Practically Impossible

Researchers discuss why our brains can't do two things at once, and why supertaskers may be different.

17-20 Segment 1: Elephant DNA: The secret to cancer suppression?

Some animals, such as elephants, almost never get cancer, and scientists have learned that the elephant DNA repair system is 20 times more powerful than the human system

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16-44 Segment 1: Lupus and the Skin

A minority of patients have lupus only on the skin, and while this is not life threatening, it can still be psychologically devastating.

15-32 Segment 2: Multitasking

  Synopsis: Multitasking seems like a necessity for most people, and most of us think it inproves our efficiency. However, studies show that only a tiny proportion of people can juggle tasks well. Researchers discuss why our brains can't do two things at once, and why "supertaskers" may be different. Host: Nancy Benson. Guests: Dr. … Continue reading 15-32 Segment 2: Multitasking