Medical Notes: Week of October 18, 2020

Medical Notes: Week of October 18, 2020

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of October 18, 2020 including: The leaders of two of the nation’s leading science advisory groups are warning about what they call “Alarming political interference” in the government’s response to COVID-19. Then, one reason people oppose action on climate change is that it’s more expensive than doing nothing, at least in the short term. And finally… if you plan on having any trick or treaters this year… a word of warning about black licorice, especially if you figure on eating the leftover candy yourself.

Medical Notes: Week of October 11, 2020

Medical Notes: Week of October 11, 2020

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of October 11, 2020 including: A group of Black physicians has created a task force to vet government decisions about COVID-19 including treatments and a possible vaccine. Then, a study showing that many youths don’t understand just how strict social distancing has to be in order to work, or that restrictions are more than a short-term requirement. And finally, migraine headaches are the third most prevalent illness in the world, but exposure to the right kind of green light can make sufferers feel much better.

Medical Notes: Week of September 27, 2020

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of September 27, 2020 including: Most of what we’ve heard about delays at the postal service have had to do with the election…but delays could also keep millions of people from getting their medications. Then, a new study finds that two-thirds of the plastic waste in the United States comes from other things like electronics, consumer products and cars. And finally, if bosses want to curb fraud and unethical behavior among employees, encourage them to put up family photos at work.

Medical Notes: Week of May 24, 2020

Medical Notes: Week of May 24, 2020

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of May 24, 2020 including: Scientists have come up with a blood test that screens for a panel of biomarkers for pancreatic cancer that's nearly 92 percent accurate. Then, a new study shows that heart valve blockages in men and women may be caused by completely different factors. Plus, a report is out indicating Americans are feeling depressed right now. And finally, doctors and nurses can’t go back and forth like they used to, and that can create communication problems. One solution at some hospitals? baby monitors.

Medical Notes: Week of April 26, 2020

Medical Notes: Week of April 26, 2020

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of April 26, 2020 including: A blood test for many types of cancer has been a long-sought goal of researchers, and now they’re much closer. Then, a team of faculty and students at Rice University has developed an automated bag valve mask ventilator using $300 worth of parts off the shelf. And finally, a study from the University of Michigan finds that if you talk to yourself in the third person by name, you’ll be less likely to cave in to tempting foods.

Medical Notes: Week of April 19, 2020

Medical Notes: Week of April 19, 2020

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of April 19, 2020 including: If you’ve been taking the drug Ranitidine for reflux or ulcer prevention, the FDA says stop. Then, a new study shows that parents are yelling at their children more since most of us have been ordered to stay home. And finally, with COVID-19 testing in such short supply… why not let a dog do it?

18-34 Segment 1: Electroshock Therapy Today

Electroconvulsive therapy still has a stigma, with the reputation of being a painful, disturbing procedure that wipes out memories and, if movies are to be believed, even creates zombies. Experts explain the reality—that ECT is a quiet procedure that provokes a short brain seizure, releasing huge amounts of neurotransmitters to reset the brain in what is the quickest and most dependable treatment for severe and often suicidal depression.

18-03 Segment 1: When Should Kids Get a Phone?

Experts discuss how parents can decide when the time is right for their kids to get their first phone.

15-47 Segment 2: Doctors’ clothes: Reason to Change?

  Synopsis: Controversy has broken out over the doctor's traditional white lab coat and necktie. Some doctors say physicians should wear short sleeves instead because coats carry germs. Others maintain the white coat isn't a germ colony, but rather is a source of comfort for patients. Experts discuss. Host: Nancy Benson. Guest: Dr. Gonzalo Bearman, … Continue reading 15-47 Segment 2: Doctors’ clothes: Reason to Change?

15-14 Story 1: Food Addiction

  Synopsis: Scientists are learning that some people can be physically addicted to certain kinds of foods, especially highly-processed foods, and suffer withdrawl when they can't have them. Experts explain the brain chemistry of food addiction, how it is virtually identical to the chemistry of drug addiction and alcoholism, and what it means for the … Continue reading 15-14 Story 1: Food Addiction