The Unmeasurable Presence Of Pain

The Unmeasurable Presence of Pain

Pain varies from person to person and is totally subjective. It can’t be truly measured. This makes pain management one of the greatest challenges in healthcare. An expert discusses how pain works and how doctors struggle to contain it.

Why Knee Replacements May Go Wrong

Why Knee Replacements May Go Wrong

Knee replacements are successful for 80 percent of recipients, yet many assume the success rate should be higher. Those who are not successful often are bitterly disappointed. However, patients and physicians can take steps to avoid a bad result. New techniques also offer much faster recovery. Experts discuss.

The Increase In Sexually Transmitted Diseases

The Increase in Sexually Transmitted Diseases

Despite social distancing, experts say people are increasingly “hooking up.” Sexually transmitted diseases are growing as a result. An expert discusses STDs in a pandemic.

How Hormones Control Our Lives

How Hormones Control Our Lives

Hormones were unknown until a little more than 100 years ago, and experts admit we still have a lot to learn. An expert author details the discovery of hormones and how our growing knowledge has shaped treatment of many diseases and conditions.

Genetic Testing For Drug Effectiveness

Genetic Testing For Drug Effectiveness

People suffering from mental illnesses often go through a number of medications before they find one that works. A genetic test seeks to discover this information right away, so patients don’t have to wait. One of the test’s developers discusses its uses.

Vaccine Passports

Vaccine Passports

Proof of having received COVID-19 vaccine may soon be required for boarding a plane, going to a ball game, going to school, having a job or eating in some restaurants. An expert involved in the design of a passport app discusses how it would all work.

What Determines Our Food Preferences?

What Determines Our Food Preferences?

Scientists are discovering that our food preferences are much more than a matter of taste, and that taste itself is more complicated than we thought. Psychology also plays a role. An expert discusses what determines preferences, such as why some people like jalapeno peppers & black coffee, and some don’t.

Smart Cars And Smart Roads

Smart Cars And Smart Roads

Cars will soon be able to provide data as well as receive it. Experts explain how cars can talk with roads, traffic signals and central computers, and how roads themselves may collect data on the cars they carry. In the future, autonomous cars may use these links to greatly speed travel and make it much safer.

Medical Notes: Week of January 3, 2021

Medical Notes: Week of January 3, 2021

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of January 3, 2021 including: The incidence of cancer is increasing among teenagers and young adults. Then, This is the time to make new year’s resolutions… but mental health experts say this year may not be the time to make big changes. And finally… your Roomba may be spying on you through your wi-fi network.

Pancreatic Cancer

Pancreatic Cancer

Pancreatic cancer is increasing, and soon to be the second leading cancer killer, since it is rarely detected in early stages. Two physicians discuss pancreatic cancer and its symptoms, as well as their research into methods to find the disease in earlier stages.

The Surprising Origins Of Chemotherapy In World War II

The Surprising Origins of Chemotherapy in World War II

Chemotherapy has saved millions of lives, but its origins date to the chemical warfare agent mustard gas. A secret shipment of the gas was released in Italy after the bombing of a US ship in World War II. An investigative reporter details how doctors turned death and tragedy to the lifesaver we know today.

Organ Thieves: The First Human Heart Transplant In The South

Organ Thieves: The First Human Heart Transplant In The South

In the race to perform the first human-to-human heart transplant, ethical corners were sometimes cut. An investigative journalist explains how a black man’s heart was harvested without his family’s consent for the first human heart transplant in the South, and how incidents such as this help to explain ongoing African-American distrust of medicine.

“Electroshock Therapy:” Not What You See In The Movies

Electroconvulsive therapy still has a stigma, with the reputation of being a painful, disturbing procedure that wipes out memories and, if movies are to be believed, even creates zombies. Experts explain the reality—that ECT is a quiet procedure that provokes a short brain seizure, releasing huge amounts of neurotransmitters to reset the brain in what is the quickest and most dependable treatment for severe and often suicidal depression.

Medical Notes: Week of June 7, 2020

Medical Notes: Week of June 7, 2020

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of June 7, 2020 including: Researchers are working on an app with a sensor to test for COVID-19 using only a drop of saliva. Then, life was more stressful than it was 25 years ago… and for middle aged people, it’s much more stressful. Plus, A study shows that emergency room visits for children for mental health disorders has increased 60 percent of the last 10 years. And finally, a study shows that homeschooled adolescents have significantly lower abdominal strength and endurance than public school kids even though their BMI’s were the same.

Medical Notes: Week of May 31, 2020

Medical Notes: Week of May 31, 2020

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of May 31, 2020 including: A newly developed smartphone app is remarkably effective at predicting if a person is infected with COVID-19. Then biomarkers for A-L-S or Lou Gehrig’s disease can be found in a person’s teeth in the first decade of life. Then, a study shows that changing the way physical therapy is done can improve strength by an additional 30 percent. And finally, The labels on drinks for kids don’t help adults figure out which ones are real fruit juice and which are sugary, artificially flavored imitations.