Medical Notes: Week of May 3, 2020

Medical Notes: Week of May 3, 2020

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of May 3, 2020 including: By now, most of us are familiar with the main symptoms of a COVID-19 infection—fever, cough, and respiratory distress. But doctors are learning that the virus may also attack the heart and brain. And finally, last year we told you about a “smart toilet seat” that could diagnose congestive heart failure. Now scientists at Stanford University have put diagnostic tools in the toilet itself.

Medical Notes: Week of January 5, 2020

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of January 5, 2020, including two experimental drugs that show promise in women with certain types of breast cancer. Then, the federal communications commission has started the process to create a three-digit number similar to 9-1-1 that connects to the National Suicide Prevention Hotline. Then, it appears that teenagers aren’t very good at telling the difference between real and fake news, and finally, can magic mushrooms be used to treat depression?

Talking to Your Baby

Scientists have discovered that the way parents talk to their infants has a huge effect on their intellectual development and later success. Experts discuss why and how parents should hold "conversations" with their babies.

18-17 Segment 1: Medicare Tackles the Opioid Epidemic

Experts discuss the new limits on Medicare prescriptions of opioids, and whether the limits will cause more pain for patients or if they will hinder the temptation to overprescribe.

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18-14 Segment 1: The Price Consequences of Doctor Consolidation

Experts discuss the incentives that have prompted the consolidation of hospitals and independent doctors, the affects it has had on the cost of healthcare, and moves to eliminate them.

16-29 Segment 1: Conversations with Babies

Experts discuss why and how parents should hold "conversations" with their babies.

15-19 Story 1: Lung cancer, no smoking

  Synopsis: Lung cancer is the world's #1 cancer killer, but its association with smoking has created a stigma that often stuns patients who never smoked and results in much less research money for lung cancer than for other less lethal diseases. Still, new treatments provide hope. Experts discuss these issues. Host: Reed Pence. Guests: … Continue reading 15-19 Story 1: Lung cancer, no smoking

15-15 Story 1: Correcting Color Blindness

  Synopsis: Color blindness (or color vision deficiency) affects up to eight percent of men. Until recently, doctors could do nothing to treat it. Now high-tech glasses can make colors come alive for many people with the most common form of color blindness. Experts explain color blindness and the glasses that can treat it. Host: … Continue reading 15-15 Story 1: Correcting Color Blindness

15-12 Story 1: Women and Work

  Synopsis: The US once led the world in proportion of women in the workplace, but that number has declined the last 15 years. Experts explain the social, economic, and governmental factors that are leading women to quit their jobs--often unwillingly--and stay home. Host: Reed Pence. Guests: Dr. Pamela Stone, Visiting Scholar, Stanford University Clayman … Continue reading 15-12 Story 1: Women and Work