Medical Notes: Week of January 26, 2020

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of January 26, 2020 including A new report from the American Cancer Society finds that in 2017, the overall cancer death rate dropped more than two percent. Then, a new experimental technique using a special kind of imaging and machine learning has been developed to battle colon cancer. Then, a new machine that can keep livers alive outside the body for a week. And finally, a class of naturally occurring proteins called sestrin can possibly deliver the benefits of exercise without moving a muscle.

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Medical Notes: Week of January 19, 2020

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of January 19, 2020, including: Late-stage age-related macular degeneration, or AMD, is the leading cause of vision loss among older people. Then, long term effects of being born as a result of in vitro fertilization. And finally, people in Scandinavian countries say that taking a sauna has all kinds of benefits, and they’re apparently right.

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Medical Notes: Week of December 15, 2019

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of December 15, 2019, including scientists may someday be able to treat alcoholic liver disease with something short of a liver transplant. Then, if you want to keep the mind alive as you age, play games. And finally, a new study shows giving buses an inexpensive engine retrofit helps not only the health of students who ride them, but also their academic performance.

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Genetic Testing and Family Secrets

The availability of consumer DNA tests and databases has allowed long-hidden family secrets to be revealed, including mistaken paternity and unknown siblings. It has also taken the anonymity away from some cases of sperm donation. Two experts discuss the ethics of overturning this promised secrecy and the impact that the revelation of secrets can have on entire families.

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Sudden Unexplained Death of a Child

Each year, some 400 US children over age 1, most of them toddlers, die overnight for no known reason. Families, longing for answers, often find that their families, friends, and even pediatricians are unfamiliar with this classification of death, or that they even occur. Family members who have lost a child, a medical examiner, and a research expert who has lost a child discuss SUDC.

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