Smoldering Concussions

Smoldering Concussions

Doctors are realizing that concussions can smolder in the brain for years with symptoms that are missed, making diagnosis at the time of occurrence all the more important. Yet a new study shows that protocols affecting the most vulnerable—young athletes—often are not followed. Experts explain why, and what people should do when they receive any blow to the head.

Medical Notes: Week of January 5, 2020

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of January 5, 2020, including two experimental drugs that show promise in women with certain types of breast cancer. Then, the federal communications commission has started the process to create a three-digit number similar to 9-1-1 that connects to the National Suicide Prevention Hotline. Then, it appears that teenagers aren’t very good at telling the difference between real and fake news, and finally, can magic mushrooms be used to treat depression?

19-44 Segment 1: Mass Violence: How Much Is Mental Illness To Blame?

Mass Violence: How Much Is Mental Illness To Blame?

Mass shootings and other forms of mass violence are on the increase. Where to assess blame is in sharp dispute. A new report from a blue ribbon panel of behavioral scientists has found that mental illnesses carry some of the blame, but mental “distress” is a much more likely factor. Panel members discuss mental health first aid, red flag laws, and other report recommendations on ways to prevent mass violence.

A Radical Diet to Prevent Heart Disease

Heart disease is the number one killer in the US, but a well known cardiologist says if everyone would follow a plant-based, oil-free diet, heart disease could be eradicated. Yet many cardiologists won’t prescribe such a diet, fearing it’s so difficult to follow that it’s a prescription for defeat. Experts discuss.

Fatty Liver Disease: Silently Growing

Most people associate cirrhosis of the liver with heavy alcohol use. But nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, which also leads to cirrhosis, is growing rapidly, and may affect a quarter of the population. Experts discuss this silent disease and what people can do to prevent and treat it.