Medical Notes: Week of April 19, 2020

Medical Notes: Week of April 19, 2020

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of April 19, 2020 including: If you’ve been taking the drug Ranitidine for reflux or ulcer prevention, the FDA says stop. Then, a new study shows that parents are yelling at their children more since most of us have been ordered to stay home. And finally, with COVID-19 testing in such short supply… why not let a dog do it?

Genetic Testing and Family Secrets

The availability of consumer DNA tests and databases has allowed long-hidden family secrets to be revealed, including mistaken paternity and unknown siblings. It has also taken the anonymity away from some cases of sperm donation. Two experts discuss the ethics of overturning this promised secrecy and the impact that the revelation of secrets can have on entire families.

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of September 8, 2019.

Medical Notes: Week of September 8, 2019

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of September 8, 2019.

19-35 Segment 1: Sudden Unexplained Death of a Child

Sudden Unexplained Death of a Child

Each year, some 400 US children over age 1, most of them toddlers, die overnight for no known reason. Families, longing for answers, often find that their families, friends, and even pediatricians are unfamiliar with this classification of death, or that they even occur. Family members who have lost a child, a medical examiner, and a research expert who has lost a child discuss SUDC.

19-32 Segment 1: The Economics of Later School Start Times

The Economics of Later School Start Times

Thirty years of research have shown that teenagers’ biology prevents them from getting to sleep much before 11pm, and with most high schools starting classes around 8 am, they are chronically sleep deprived. Experts discuss how students and even the economy would benefit from later start times and the reasons many people and school districts still oppose the change.

Why Parents Don’t Vaccinate

Measles had been declared eliminated in 2000, but has come roaring back because of the increasing number of people who have not been vaccinated. Parents may have legitimate fears of side effects, but claims vaccines are unsafe are not true. Experts discuss the complicated psychological reasons vaccine refusal exists despite this, and what may help change minds to promote public health.

Exceptional Breastfeeding

Most infants are breastfed in the US today, but breastfeeding often doesn’t look the way most of us think of it, as a result of adoption, same sex marriage, and other changes in parenting. An expert discusses some of the hurdles and challenges to getting infants the best nutrition possible.

Exceptional Breastfeeding

Most infants are breastfed in the US today, but breastfeeding often doesn’t look the way most of us think of it, as a result of adoption, same sex marriage, and other changes in parenting. An expert discusses some of the hurdles and challenges to getting infants the best nutrition possible.

Medical Notes : Week of March 31, 2019

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of March 31, 2019.