19-37 Segment 2: Primary Care And Medical Cost

Primary Care And Medical Cost

The US spends more on medical care than other nations while quality still lags behind. A health industry expert explains how increased use of primary care and increased engagement with providers could reverse both trends.

Why Good Health Care Doesn’t Equal Good Health

Many Americans believe if they have good health care, they’ll have good health. But many factors beyond medicine contribute to our level of health. A noted public health expert explains these factors, and why our own health is much more than an individual concern.

The Workings of the Immune System

Millions of Americans cannot afford the medications they’ve been prescribed. Many skip doses, split pills or don’t fill prescriptions at all as a result, with sometimes even fatal consequences. But doctors are often unable to consider cost very well in prescribing, as the same drug often costs patients vastly different amounts due to insurance differences. Experts discuss the problem and what patients can do to save.

Medical Notes: Week of 26, 2019

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of May 26, 2019.

Cancer Suppression: Lessons from Pachyderms

DNA mutations happen all the time in the body, but the immune system usually detects and deals with them. When the system fails, cancer results. Yet some animals, such as elephants, almost never get cancer, and scientists have learned that the elephant DNA repair system is 20 times more powerful than the human system. Experts explain how they hope to tap this knowledge.

Rethinking Dementia

Dementia has a much wider range than most people think, and people with dementia are usually functional for years. An expert discusses the course of the disease and how life can still be positive for years before it reaches the late, debilitating stage most people think of when they hear the word “dementia.”

High Drug Prices Lead to Drug Misuse

Millions of Americans cannot afford the medications they’ve been prescribed. Many skip doses, split pills or don’t fill prescriptions at all as a result, with sometimes even fatal consequences. But doctors are often unable to consider cost very well in prescribing, as the same drug often costs patients vastly different amounts due to insurance differences. Experts discuss the problem and what patients can do to save.

Brain Aneurysm Through the Eyes of a Survivor

Brain aneurysms—bulging in a brain blood vessel, like an inflated balloon—affect 1 in 50 people and are generally without symptoms until they burst. This occurs in about 30,000 people per year in the US, accounting for 3-5 percent of all new strokes. Here is the story of one survivor in her own words.

Penicillin Allergy: Not really, most of the time

Millions of Americans believe they are allergic to penicillin. However, most of them are wrong. Experts discuss how these misdiagnoses happen and what results when so many of us avoid the most effective, yet cheapest antibiotic.

Unraveling the Mystery of the Flu

The flu’s unique ability to mutate makes it one of the toughest diseases to solve, as it evades vaccines and treatment. It also has a deadly history, which prompts fears each flu season. A noted expert discusses all about the flu and its myths.

Mental Health in the ER

Many people having a mental health crisis go to the emergency room. However, ER’s are not well equipped to handle them, and many patients are boarded there for hours or even days without treatment. Experts discuss the reasons for the failure, the outcomes it produces, and solutions that have been successful in limited trials.

Heart Disease Misinformation

Heart disease is often preventable, but how people look at it often keeps them from doing as much about it as they could. Often this is a result of myth and misinformation. An expert physician discusses some of the most harmful of these myths.

The Miracle of Transplants

Organ transplantation has dramatically changed lives and is raising hopes it could do even more for millions of people. But getting where we are has not been easy. A transplant surgeon traces the history of transplant research and notes the courage to fail among pioneering researchers and patients.

Examining “Medicare For All”

Two Congressional plans, one from each side of the political spectrum, are competing to blow up the current healthcare system. Here experts examine one of them—the left’s bid to replace private insurers with a government-run single-payer plan labeled “Medicare for All.” Alternatives may include bolstering the Affordable Care Act, or getting rid of it completely.

Symptom Searching on the Internet

One of the most popular searches on Google is for symptoms and what they mean. It’s created a much more well informed patient population, but one that may panic at the least pain or discomfort. Two experts discuss how to think of symptoms and how to search for them.