Rethinking Dementia

Rethinking Dementia

Dementia has a much wider range than most people think, and people with dementia are usually functional for years. An expert discusses the course of the disease and how life can still be positive for years before it reaches the late, debilitating stage most people think of when they hear the word “dementia.”

The Psychology of Procrastination

The Psychology of Procrastination

Most people procrastinate at least now and then. But when we put something off, we’re usually facing not a time management problem, but an emotion management problem. Experts discuss what’s going on in our heads when we procrastinate.

How High Drug Prices Lead To Drug Misuse

Millions of Americans cannot afford the medications they’ve been prescribed. Many skip doses, split pills or don’t fill prescriptions at all as a result, with sometimes even fatal consequences. But doctors are often unable to consider cost very well in prescribing, as the same drug often costs patients vastly different amounts due to insurance differences. Experts discuss the problem and what patients can do to save.

Brain Aneurysm Through the Eyes of a Survivor

Brain Aneurysm Through the Eyes of a Survivor

Brain aneurysms—bulging in a brain blood vessel, like an inflated balloon—affect 1 in 50 people and are generally without symptoms until they burst. This occurs in about 30,000 people per year in the US, accounting for 3-5 percent of all new strokes. Here is the story of one survivor in her own words.

The Surprising Origins Of Chemotherapy In World War II

The Surprising Origins of Chemotherapy in World War II

Chemotherapy has saved millions of lives, but its origins date to the chemical warfare agent mustard gas. A secret shipment of the gas was released in Italy after the bombing of a US ship in World War II. An investigative reporter details how doctors turned death and tragedy to the lifesaver we know today.

Medical Notes: Week of February 9, 2020

Medical Notes: Week of February 9, 2020

The gap between black and white uninsured rates has dropped by more than four percent. Plus, a new study in the Journal of General Internal Medicine shows that only two percent of those who are considered high risk for drug overdose have filled a prescription for Naloxone. Then, Cancer patients often receive radiation therapy over several months, but a new study shows how it could all be done in less than one second using high-energy flash therapy. And finally, a study in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine shows that when we lose weight, we lose it everywhere, even in the tongue.

Medical Notes: Week of February 2, 2020

Medical Notes: Week of February 2, 2020

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of February 2, 2020 including a vaccine against dementia could be in human trials within a couple of years. Then, computers are taking over a lot of functions… and reading mammograms may someday be one of them. And finally, just about everybody knows that the normal temperature of the human body is 98-point-six. except it’s not any more.

Medical Notes: Week of January 26, 2020

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of January 26, 2020 including A new report from the American Cancer Society finds that in 2017, the overall cancer death rate dropped more than two percent. Then, a new experimental technique using a special kind of imaging and machine learning has been developed to battle colon cancer. Then, a new machine that can keep livers alive outside the body for a week. And finally, a class of naturally occurring proteins called sestrin can possibly deliver the benefits of exercise without moving a muscle.

Medical Notes: Week of January 19, 2020

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of January 19, 2020, including: Late-stage age-related macular degeneration, or AMD, is the leading cause of vision loss among older people. Then, long term effects of being born as a result of in vitro fertilization. And finally, people in Scandinavian countries say that taking a sauna has all kinds of benefits, and they’re apparently right.

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of December 8, 2019 including a study showing all those messages about protecting yourself from the sun may be sinking in. Then, new studies in the journal “Pediatrics” could provide reassurance that the HPV vaccine is safe, and finally, with the new year not far away, more Americans are trying to lose weight.

Medical Notes: Week of December 8, 2019

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of December 8, 2019 including a study showing all those messages about protecting yourself from the sun may be sinking in. Then, new studies in the journal “Pediatrics” could provide reassurance that the HPV vaccine is safe, and finally, with the new year not far away, more Americans are trying to lose weight.

19-34 Segment 1: A Closer Look at Food Waste

A Closer Look at Food Waste

Experts believe about 40 percent of the food available in America is thrown away. Solving this environmental problem also creates an opportunity to help with food insecurity. It starts with consumers. Experts explain where waste comes from and how people can cut down on its production.