Medical Notes: Week of February 9, 2020

Medical Notes: Week of February 9, 2020

The gap between black and white uninsured rates has dropped by more than four percent. Plus, a new study in the Journal of General Internal Medicine shows that only two percent of those who are considered high risk for drug overdose have filled a prescription for Naloxone. Then, Cancer patients often receive radiation therapy over several months, but a new study shows how it could all be done in less than one second using high-energy flash therapy. And finally, a study in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine shows that when we lose weight, we lose it everywhere, even in the tongue.

Medical Notes: Week of February 2, 2020

Medical Notes: Week of February 2, 2020

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of February 2, 2020 including a vaccine against dementia could be in human trials within a couple of years. Then, computers are taking over a lot of functions… and reading mammograms may someday be one of them. And finally, just about everybody knows that the normal temperature of the human body is 98-point-six. except it’s not any more.

Medical Notes: Week of January 26, 2020

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of January 26, 2020 including A new report from the American Cancer Society finds that in 2017, the overall cancer death rate dropped more than two percent. Then, a new experimental technique using a special kind of imaging and machine learning has been developed to battle colon cancer. Then, a new machine that can keep livers alive outside the body for a week. And finally, a class of naturally occurring proteins called sestrin can possibly deliver the benefits of exercise without moving a muscle.

Medical Notes: Week of January 19, 2020

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of January 19, 2020, including: Late-stage age-related macular degeneration, or AMD, is the leading cause of vision loss among older people. Then, long term effects of being born as a result of in vitro fertilization. And finally, people in Scandinavian countries say that taking a sauna has all kinds of benefits, and they’re apparently right.

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of December 8, 2019 including a study showing all those messages about protecting yourself from the sun may be sinking in. Then, new studies in the journal “Pediatrics” could provide reassurance that the HPV vaccine is safe, and finally, with the new year not far away, more Americans are trying to lose weight.

Medical Notes: Week of December 8, 2019

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of December 8, 2019 including a study showing all those messages about protecting yourself from the sun may be sinking in. Then, new studies in the journal “Pediatrics” could provide reassurance that the HPV vaccine is safe, and finally, with the new year not far away, more Americans are trying to lose weight.

19-34 Segment 1: A Closer Look at Food Waste

A Closer Look at Food Waste

Experts believe about 40 percent of the food available in America is thrown away. Solving this environmental problem also creates an opportunity to help with food insecurity. It starts with consumers. Experts explain where waste comes from and how people can cut down on its production.

Copper Toxicity

High levels of copper in the body can produce mental health symptoms such as depression, anxiety, and aggression. However, most doctors don’t test for copper levels and may prescribe medications like antidepressants instead. An author who suffered years with undiagnosed copper toxicity and two expert psychiatrists discuss diagnosis and treatment.

19-32 Segment 1: The Economics of Later School Start Times

The Economics of Later School Start Times

Thirty years of research have shown that teenagers’ biology prevents them from getting to sleep much before 11pm, and with most high schools starting classes around 8 am, they are chronically sleep deprived. Experts discuss how students and even the economy would benefit from later start times and the reasons many people and school districts still oppose the change.

TBI’s, Personality Change, and Marriage

Traumatic brain injury can profoundly change the injured in personality and temperament, as well as physically and cognitively. Spouses bear the brunt of these changes to the point many feel like they’re living with a stranger. Two experts and the spouse of a TBI victim discuss the many ways life changes after an injury and what can help to get them through the ordeal.

School Crossing Safety

With the school year approaching, drivers need to be aware of children in crosswalks—and away from them. However, increasing distractions for both pedestrians and drivers sometimes make that difficult. A safety expert and a veteran school crossing guard—the nation’s “favorite crossing guard”-- discuss.