Medical Notes: Week of July 26, 2020

Medical Notes: Week of July 26, 2020

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of July 26, 2020 including: Evidence is piling up that face masks cut the risk of getting COVID-19 by up to 65 percent. Then, a study finds that, at least in the laboratory, a common asthma drug can prevent the formation of tangles. Then, A study finds that cord blood helps some children with autism improve their social communication skills. And finally, if you feel especially insecure about your romantic partner… it may be all in your genes.

Genetic Testing and Family Secrets

The availability of consumer DNA tests and databases has allowed long-hidden family secrets to be revealed, including mistaken paternity and unknown siblings. It has also taken the anonymity away from some cases of sperm donation. Two experts discuss the ethics of overturning this promised secrecy and the impact that the revelation of secrets can have on entire families.

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of September 8, 2019.

Medical Notes: Week of September 8, 2019

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of September 8, 2019.

Genetic and Genomic Testing

When most of us think of genetic testing for health, we imagine tests to detect whether we’ve inherited genes that predispose us for cancer or other serious disease. But another kind of gene testing—genomic testing of tumor cells for their susceptibility to targeted treatments—is giving thousands of people hope of survival they’ve never had before. Experts discuss both genetic and genomic testing.

Can IUDs and Other Contraceptives Trigger Autoimmune Disease?

Autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and lupus carry a genetic predisposition, but need an environmental trigger to take hold. Triggers are poorly understood, but some women claim their disease is a result of contraceptives, including birth control pills and IUD’s. Experts and one women suffering from autoimmune disease discuss the issue.

Cancer Suppression: Lessons from Pachyderms

DNA mutations happen all the time in the body, but the immune system usually detects and deals with them. When the system fails, cancer results. Yet some animals, such as elephants, almost never get cancer, and scientists have learned that the elephant DNA repair system is 20 times more powerful than the human system. Experts explain how they hope to tap this knowledge.

Medical Notes: Week of March 3, 2019

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of March 3, 2019.

When Does Genetic Engineering Go Too Far?

Advancements in genetic science are often clouded in ethical controversy. Often, scientists are accused of “playing God.” Experts discuss a new platform where scientists and public can debate it, and from which education can be disseminated.

18-51 Segment 2: Little People, Disability and the Prospect of “Cure”

Many people with dwarfism also face skeletal abnormalities which can lead to disability. Experts, and little people themselves, discuss major causes of dwarfism, the hurdles they create, the struggle for respect, and the prospect of treatments that could one day make little people much more rare.

Medical Notes 18-48

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of December 2, 2018.

Medical Notes 18-45

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of November 11, 2018.

18-38 Segment 2: Gene Research and Our Medical Future

Gene research has made incredible leaps in the last decade. A physician/Pulitzer-prize winning author explains what our new knowledge means for our immediate medical future, given our struggles with genetic knowledge in the past.

16-28 Segment 2: Our New Genetic Knowledge

  Gene research has made incredible leaps in the last decade. A physician/Pulitzer-prize winning author explains what our new knowledge means for our immediate medical future, given our struggles with genetic knowledge in the past. Stay in the loop! Follow us on Twitter and like us on Facebook! Subscribe and review on iTunes! Guest: Dr. Siddhartha Mukherjee, Asst. … Continue reading 16-28 Segment 2: Our New Genetic Knowledge