Music And Medicine

Music And Medicine

Pre-medical students have typically majored in science, but some medical schools are finding that liberal arts and even music majors with no science background can do well. Some admissions officers and doctors believe they may even have advantages, given the importance of communications in the doctor-patient relationship. A musician-turned-med student, an admissions officer and a musical doctor explain.

19-36 Segment 1: Surviving An Active Shooter

Surviving An Active Shooter

With the recent active shooter incidents in El Paso and Dayton, these incidents no longer seem rare, and experts say there’s been a shift in public perception. Now they seemingly could happen anywhere, and it’s become a public health issue. Two experts discuss the changing theory of how to survive an active shooter incident through what’s called “run, hide, and fight.”

19-36 Segment 2: Fighting Off Stress at College

Fighting Off Stress at College

College students are facing more stress than ever, but may be less prepared to handle it. As students head back to campus, two experts discuss how students can reduce stress.

19-32 Segment 1: The Economics of Later School Start Times

The Economics of Later School Start Times

Thirty years of research have shown that teenagers’ biology prevents them from getting to sleep much before 11pm, and with most high schools starting classes around 8 am, they are chronically sleep deprived. Experts discuss how students and even the economy would benefit from later start times and the reasons many people and school districts still oppose the change.

Dog Breeds and Dog Bites

Nearly 40 percent of American homes have a dog, and while dogs may be “man’s best friend,” sometimes they bite, and sometimes with serious consequences. An expert who has studied dog bites discusses the reality of breed temperament, especially when children are around, how to prevent bites, and whether breeds with dangerous reputations deserve them.

School Crossing Safety

With the school year approaching, drivers need to be aware of children in crosswalks—and away from them. However, increasing distractions for both pedestrians and drivers sometimes make that difficult. A safety expert and a veteran school crossing guard—the nation’s “favorite crossing guard”-- discuss.

Weight Loss Surgery for Teenagers

The proportion of severely obese teenagers continues to rise. Doctors increasingly understand that only weight loss surgery is likely to help them lose weight and avoid health consequences of obesity. But teens are often held back until they’re so heavy that even bariatric surgery isn’t enough to return them to normal weight. Experts discuss.

“Difficult” Patients: Questioning Authority

Patients used to accept doctors’ orders without question. Today, more are asking questions and challenging their doctors’ opinions. However, even those who do it politely are likely to be labeled “difficult.” A doctor whose late wife nearly made a career of being a difficult patient discusses how patients can do it respectfully and fruitfully.

Taking Body Basics Seriously

Many people have questions about their bodies that seem so silly, they never bring them up with their doctors. While the answers are sometimes humorous, often they are more complicated and important than we imagine. An expert physician/writer discusses.

Research Ethics: How Far Have We Come?

In the mid-1960s, many Ivy League and Seven Sister colleges as well as prestigious prep schools allowed researchers to photograph incoming students naked as part of work on a now-discredited theory linking physical characteristics to leadership potential. A former student who went through it, now a physician and writer, discusses how research ethics have changed in the last 50 years.

Medical Notes: Week of February 24, 2019

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of February 24, 2019.

When Does Genetic Engineering Go Too Far?

Advancements in genetic science are often clouded in ethical controversy. Often, scientists are accused of “playing God.” Experts discuss a new platform where scientists and public can debate it, and from which education can be disseminated.

Talking to Your Baby

Scientists have discovered that the way parents talk to their infants has a huge effect on their intellectual development and later success. Experts discuss why and how parents should hold "conversations" with their babies.