Advances Against Lung Cancer

Advances Against Lung Cancer

More people die of lung cancer than breast, prostate, and colon cancer combined. A decade ago, a lung cancer diagnosis was often a death sentence. But now treatments are being developed that mean it can often be treated, especially if screening detects it early. A patient/advocate and researcher discuss.

Medical Notes: Week of May 9, 2021

Medical Notes: Week of May 9, 2021

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of May 9, 2021 including: The injection of nanoparticles deep into the brain can produce relief for those with chronic pain and depression. Then, diagnoses for the four most common cancers take a big jump when people hit age 65. And finally, a new study shows that narcissistic people pump themselves up only because deep down inside, they don’t believe they’re any good.

Medical Notes: Week of February 7, 2021

Medical Notes: Week of February 7, 2021

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of February 7, 2021 including: New statistics from the American Cancer Society show that cancer deaths are continuing to drop. Then, a study finds that reopening schools doesn’t increase hospitalizations for Covid-19… at least not in areas where hospitalizations are low. Then, a new study showing that saliva tests are just as accurate and much more convenient than nose swabs. And finally… If you’ve received cosmetic facial fillers… there’s a slight chance the Covid-19 vaccine may cause a reaction to them.

Medical Notes: Week of January 10, 2021

Medical Notes: Week of January 10, 2021

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of January 10, 2021 including: Doctors consider people at high risk for a stroke if they have medical conditions like diabetes or high blood pressure. But maybe they should consider whether they’re depressed as well. Then, children under age two may suffer effects from antibiotics later on in childhood. And finally, mom may have always told you to eat your vegetables… but a little meat and dairy keep people from breaking bones.

Medical Notes: Week of January 3, 2021

Medical Notes: Week of January 3, 2021

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of January 3, 2021 including: The incidence of cancer is increasing among teenagers and young adults. Then, This is the time to make new year’s resolutions… but mental health experts say this year may not be the time to make big changes. And finally… your Roomba may be spying on you through your wi-fi network.

Medical Notes: Week of May 24, 2020

Medical Notes: Week of May 24, 2020

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of May 24, 2020 including: Scientists have come up with a blood test that screens for a panel of biomarkers for pancreatic cancer that's nearly 92 percent accurate. Then, a new study shows that heart valve blockages in men and women may be caused by completely different factors. Plus, a report is out indicating Americans are feeling depressed right now. And finally, doctors and nurses can’t go back and forth like they used to, and that can create communication problems. One solution at some hospitals? baby monitors.

Medical Notes: Week of April 26, 2020

Medical Notes: Week of April 26, 2020

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of April 26, 2020 including: A blood test for many types of cancer has been a long-sought goal of researchers, and now they’re much closer. Then, a team of faculty and students at Rice University has developed an automated bag valve mask ventilator using $300 worth of parts off the shelf. And finally, a study from the University of Michigan finds that if you talk to yourself in the third person by name, you’ll be less likely to cave in to tempting foods.

Medical Notes: Week of February 9, 2020

Medical Notes: Week of February 9, 2020

The gap between black and white uninsured rates has dropped by more than four percent. Plus, a new study in the Journal of General Internal Medicine shows that only two percent of those who are considered high risk for drug overdose have filled a prescription for Naloxone. Then, Cancer patients often receive radiation therapy over several months, but a new study shows how it could all be done in less than one second using high-energy flash therapy. And finally, a study in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine shows that when we lose weight, we lose it everywhere, even in the tongue.

Medical Notes: Week of January 5, 2020

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of January 5, 2020, including two experimental drugs that show promise in women with certain types of breast cancer. Then, the federal communications commission has started the process to create a three-digit number similar to 9-1-1 that connects to the National Suicide Prevention Hotline. Then, it appears that teenagers aren’t very good at telling the difference between real and fake news, and finally, can magic mushrooms be used to treat depression?

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of December 8, 2019 including a study showing all those messages about protecting yourself from the sun may be sinking in. Then, new studies in the journal “Pediatrics” could provide reassurance that the HPV vaccine is safe, and finally, with the new year not far away, more Americans are trying to lose weight.

Medical Notes: Week of December 8, 2019

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of December 8, 2019 including a study showing all those messages about protecting yourself from the sun may be sinking in. Then, new studies in the journal “Pediatrics” could provide reassurance that the HPV vaccine is safe, and finally, with the new year not far away, more Americans are trying to lose weight.

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of December 1, 2019.

Medical Notes: Week of December 1, 2019

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of December 1, 2019, including: A study that finds that artery blockages discovered during stress tests can be managed with medication. Then, a study indicating cigarette smoking has hit an all-time low. Also, having more meatless burgers now could cut your dementia risk later. And finally, if people are more anxious these days, maybe it’s because they’re not getting enough sleep.

Obesity and Cancer Risk

Studies are finding that obesity significantly increases a person’s risk for a variety of cancers. However, not all forms of fat carry equal risk. An expert discusses who is more at risk and why.