The Benefits of Handwriting

Today’s students often type their assignments, no matter the grade level. Writing by hand is done less frequently, and some students are barely able to produce cursive writing. However, studies show that writing by hand creates a better connection to the brain for learning content. Experts discuss how we might tap this connection in an increasingly tech world.

Assessing the Psychological Wreckage of the Pandemic

Many people are relieved that, thanks to vaccines, the COVID-19 pandemic seems to be waning. But the mental health wreckage of the last year will take longer to overcome. Experts discuss how it’s showing up and what people can do to get back on track.  

Medical Notes: Week of April 4, 2021

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of April 4, 2021 including: One of the oldest drugs in the world, aspirin, may help prevent COVID-19 infections and make illnesses that do take place much less serious. Then, people with Crohn’s disease often have flare-ups. One reason those sores don’t heal—fungus in foods. And finally… bosses who demand that employees keep their noses to the grindstone may be hurting productivity.

The Unmeasurable Presence Of Pain

The Unmeasurable Presence of Pain

Pain varies from person to person and is totally subjective. It can’t be truly measured. This makes pain management one of the greatest challenges in healthcare. An expert discusses how pain works and how doctors struggle to contain it.

The Unmeasurable Presence Of Pain

Our Disastrous Pandemic Diets

During the pandemic, millions of people have adopted diets full of comfort food, and have wrecked their heart health in the process. Now as the world begins to return to a semblance of normal, they will face wildly conflicting dietary advice. An expert cardiologist discusses how people can cut through the confusion. 

Medical Notes: Week of March 21, 2021

Medical Notes: Week of March 28, 2021

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of March 28, 2021 including: About 10 percent of people will have a kidney stone at some point in their lives. When it happens, doctors may want to check for Osteoporosis, too. Then, more evidence that a vitamin d deficiency may leave you more susceptible to COVID. And finally… a lot of people take a probiotic to improve their gut health, but a new study suggests… try avocados instead.

Why Knee Replacements May Go Wrong

Why Knee Replacements May Go Wrong

Knee replacements are successful for 80 percent of recipients, yet many assume the success rate should be higher. Those who are not successful often are bitterly disappointed. However, patients and physicians can take steps to avoid a bad result. New techniques also offer much faster recovery. Experts discuss.

Pioneering Women Doctors

Pioneering Women Doctors

Today, women outnumber men in medical school. But 175 years ago, women were unheard of in medicine. An author discusses the ingenuity it took for two sisters to break barriers in medicine for women.

Medical Notes: Week of March 21, 2021

Medical Notes: Week of March 21, 2021

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of March 21, 2021 including: Rich countries are buying all the available COVID-19 vaccine for themselves… leaving poor countries in the cold. Then, Have you been double masking? If you haven’t been able to get the vaccine, it could be one of the best things you can do to stay safe from COVID. And finally, you may think that loud music is distracting while you’re driving… but a new study finds that young drivers are more distracted by not having music.

I’m Vaccinated. Now What?

I’m Vaccinated. Now What?

Americans have waited anxiously for the COVID-19 vaccine. Now that it’s being rapidly deployed, how much will it change life for those who’ve received it? Experts offer a primer on exactly how the vaccines work, what activities recipients can and can’t safely do, and estimates of when masks won’t be necessary.

Epilepsy Myths

Epilepsy Myths

Epilepsy affects 3.5 million Americans, yet stigma prevents many from speaking out, which in turn prolongs the stigma. An award-winning writer who has epilepsy describes the discrimination faced by people with seizure disorders and dispels the many myths many people hold about them.

Medical Notes: Week of March 14, 2021

Medical Notes: Week of March 14, 2021

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of March 14, 2021 including: Scientists have developed a urine test that’s extremely accurate at finding prostate cancer. Then, Spanking a child may be as bad for their mental health as being abused or neglected. And finally, we’ve heard about dogs that can sniff out cancer. Now we know they can sniff out COVID-19, too.

The Downside Of “Springing Ahead”

The Downside Of “Springing Ahead”

The annual switch to Daylight Saving Time brings more accidents, heart attacks, and other health effects. Surprisingly, they don’t completely go away until we go back to Standard Time in the fall. Experts discuss health and mental effects of body clocks not being in synch with the actual time, and how year-around consistency would help. But should it be Standard Time or DST? Experts discuss alternatives.

The Increase In Sexually Transmitted Diseases

The Increase in Sexually Transmitted Diseases

Despite social distancing, experts say people are increasingly “hooking up.” Sexually transmitted diseases are growing as a result. An expert discusses STDs in a pandemic.

Medical Notes: Week of March 7, 2021

Medical Notes: Week of March 7, 2021

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of March 7, 2021 including: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says in the first half of 2020, overall American life expectancy dropped by a full year. Then, a new study finds that one third of Americans are anxious and depressed today. And finally… one way to reduce all that anxiety—listen to 80’s music.