From Now Until The Vaccine

From Now Until The Vaccine

New COVID-19 vaccines won’t be available for most people until spring, and the months until then may have a staggering cost in lives and illness. A noted infectious disease expert discusses probable time lines and events between now and the vaccine’s availability, and how adherence to social distancing and masking could change outcomes.

What’s Up With Hiccups?

Hiccups are annoying and uncomfortable, and doctors don’t know why we (and most other species) get them. An expert explains what we know about what hiccups are and why most home remedies actually work.

Should We Report “Bad Parents?”

Should We Report “Bad Parents?”

Just about anyone can report a parent to a child abuse hotline. It’s meant to protect children, but often, parents are reported when no abuse or neglect exists in order to retaliate for a divorce or some other grievance. Some parents are reported for merely letting children play outside or walk to school without an adult in attendance, what was once thought of as normal. Some activists say this robs children of independence. An expert and a woman who went through an unjustified child abuse investigation discuss.

Nerve Growth Factors: New Hope For TBI’s, MS, ALS?

Nerve Growth Factors: New Hope For TBI’s, MS, ALS?

Unlike most cells in the human body, the central nervous system cannot repair itself. People who suffer brain or spinal cord injuries, or neurological disorders such as MS and ALS have few alternatives. A neurological researcher describes how he has discovered previously unknown nerve growth factors that could someday allow such injuries and diseases to heal.

Medical Notes: Week of December 6, 2020

Medical Notes: Week of December 6, 2020

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of December 6, 2020 including: Doctors are continuing to find new ways among old drugs to cut the damage done by COVID-19. Then, if you live out in the quiet countryside, you may be at lower risk of developing Alzheimer’s Disease. And finally, a study finds that, especially during the pandemic, video games can be good for your mental health and well being.

The Surprising Origins Of Chemotherapy In World War II

The Surprising Origins of Chemotherapy in World War II

Chemotherapy has saved millions of lives, but its origins date to the chemical warfare agent mustard gas. A secret shipment of the gas was released in Italy after the bombing of a US ship in World War II. An investigative reporter details how doctors turned death and tragedy to the lifesaver we know today.

Moms Released From Prison

Moms Released From Prison

Women are the fastest-growing prison population, but when they’re released, they face far more barriers to successful reintegration into society than men, especially if they have children. Experts and a former inmate running a new program for moms in prison discuss barriers and ways to overcome them.

Medical Notes: Week of November 29, 2020

Medical Notes: Week of November 29, 2020

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of November 29, 2020 including: Two COVID vaccines showing a better than 90-percent effectiveness rate now have the data to seek emergency approval from the FDA. Then, a study shows that signs of concussion can be detected in a person’s saliva. And finally, a new study finds that deflating soccer balls just a little could cut concussion injuries in the sport.

Where Can We Gather? The Zoom Thanksgiving

Where Can We Gather? The Zoom Thanksgiving

Getting together with family and friends over the holidays will be different this year due to COVID-19 precautions for families and governmental restrictions on restaurants and bars. The hospitality industry complains it’s unfairly targeted, but data shows it’s a COVID hotspot. Yet families in homes can repeat some of the same errors. Experts discuss how to keep gatherings safe and the consequences if we don’t.

Medical Notes: Week of November 22, 2020

Medical Notes: Week of November 22, 2020

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of November 22, 2020 including: Scientists say they’ve come up with a simple skin test that can accurately diagnose Parkinson’s. Then, a new Covid-19 test could be coming that requires you to simply gargle with a sterile saltwater solution. Then, a study shows that a single dose of sub-anesthetic ketamine can treat lazy eye. And finally… a study that shows how smog generates plastic trash.

The Effects of 2020 Stress

The Effects of 2020 Stress

2020 has produced an ongoing barrage of stressful events, and psychologists say the months of strain have started to show in both physical and mental breakdowns among increasing numbers of people. Three mental health professionals discuss the signs that a person is in trouble, and what they can do to get through these difficult times intact.

Medical Notes: Week of November 15, 2020

Medical Notes: Week of November 15, 2020

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of November 15, 2020 including: A study finds that some occupations may be more at risk of getting seriously ill. Then, a new study shows that men in jobs with hard physical work have a 55 percent higher risk of developing dementia, compared to men doing more sedentary work. And finally… it’s no secret that alcohol consumption has gone up in the pandemic. But a recent survey has quantified some of the results.

How Deep Are The Differences Of Left Handers?

How Deep Are the Differences of Left Handers?

Handedness is a central part of a person’s identity. Left-handers are often seen as somehow different than the rest of us, and over history they’ve been stereotyped as more quirky, intelligent, and sinister than righties. Science shows that some labels are likely to be true. Experts discuss where handedness comes from, and what differences truly result.