Medical Notes: Week of July 5, 2020

Medical Notes: Week of July 5, 2020

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of July 5, 2020 including: Shelter in place rules have brought the economy to its knees but researchers say it was worth it. Then, people who’ve never smoked make up about 25 percent of those who develop the lung disease COPD. Plus, resetting the body clock may be as simple as exercise. And finally, people have joked about the “COVID 15,” the supposed weight gain of people staying home during the pandemic. But a new study shows it’s a real thing.

Medical Notes: Week of June 28, 2020

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of June 28, 2020 including: Researchers have been looking for an already existing drug to quickly take on COVID-19, and apparently, now they’ve found one. Meanwhile, the Food and Drug Administration has closed the door on using the malaria treatment Hydroxychloroquine (hy-drox-ee-klor-oh-quin) to treat COVID-19. Then, social isolation has been a lifesaver the last few months, but if it goes on too long, isolation can lead to shorter lifespans. And finally, when employees start going back to the workplace in large numbers you can expect disastrous traffic on the roads.

Medical Notes: Week of June 21, 2020

Medical Notes: Week of June 21, 2020

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of June 21, 2020 including: A study finds a much lower death rate among coronavirus patients placed on a ventilator. Then, everyone’s wiping down surfaces with disinfectant these days…but they may become contaminated again within seconds. Then, a new study shows that one reason older men have a higher risk for COVID-19 is because they’re not worried about it. And finally, if you’re counting on your child to grow out of being a picky eater…it may never happen.

Medical Notes: Week of June 14, 2020

Medical Notes: Week of June 14, 2020

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of June 14, 2020 including: People who recover from a coronavirus infection often still have a long way to go to recover their mental health. Then, a study that shows sick leave is a good way to slow the spread of diseases like COVID-19. Then, doing good for other people is contagious. And finally, if you’re feeling stressed and anxious about the pandemic… You can bet your dog or cat is feeling it just as much.

Medical Notes: Week of June 7, 2020

Medical Notes: Week of June 7, 2020

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of June 7, 2020 including: Researchers are working on an app with a sensor to test for COVID-19 using only a drop of saliva. Then, life was more stressful than it was 25 years ago… and for middle aged people, it’s much more stressful. Plus, A study shows that emergency room visits for children for mental health disorders has increased 60 percent of the last 10 years. And finally, a study shows that homeschooled adolescents have significantly lower abdominal strength and endurance than public school kids even though their BMI’s were the same.

Medical Notes: Week of May 31, 2020

Medical Notes: Week of May 31, 2020

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of May 31, 2020 including: A newly developed smartphone app is remarkably effective at predicting if a person is infected with COVID-19. Then biomarkers for A-L-S or Lou Gehrig’s disease can be found in a person’s teeth in the first decade of life. Then, a study shows that changing the way physical therapy is done can improve strength by an additional 30 percent. And finally, The labels on drinks for kids don’t help adults figure out which ones are real fruit juice and which are sugary, artificially flavored imitations.

Medical Notes: Week of May 24, 2020

Medical Notes: Week of May 24, 2020

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of May 24, 2020 including: Scientists have come up with a blood test that screens for a panel of biomarkers for pancreatic cancer that's nearly 92 percent accurate. Then, a new study shows that heart valve blockages in men and women may be caused by completely different factors. Plus, a report is out indicating Americans are feeling depressed right now. And finally, doctors and nurses can’t go back and forth like they used to, and that can create communication problems. One solution at some hospitals? baby monitors.

Medical Notes: Week of May 17, 2020

Medical Notes: Week of May 17, 2020

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of May 17, 2020 including: People with heart attacks and other health emergencies are avoiding the emergency room for fear of contracting COVID-19. Then, a study showing that artificial intelligence can predict with about 80 percent accuracy which moderately-infected COVID-19 patients will get worse and which ones won’t. Next, a study saying that having your first child by C-section may lead to impaired fertility. And finally, men, if your wife says she needs just a little more sleep, believe her.

Medical Notes 20-19

Medical Notes: Week of May 10, 2020

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of May 10, 2020 including: A number of new treatments for COVID-19 are showing promise and could be fast-tracked if clinical trials continue to show good results. Then, another trial of 53 severely ill patients reported in the New England Journal of Medicine found that 68 percent showed clinical improvement with Remdesivir. Then, viruses like COVID-19 that jump from animals to people are going to become more common. Then, If you’re having trouble sleeping these days, you’re far from alone. And finally many people are concerned about getting COVID-19 from food they buy, but scientists say the risk of that is very, very low.

Medical Notes: Week of May 3, 2020

Medical Notes: Week of May 3, 2020

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of May 3, 2020 including: By now, most of us are familiar with the main symptoms of a COVID-19 infection—fever, cough, and respiratory distress. But doctors are learning that the virus may also attack the heart and brain. And finally, last year we told you about a “smart toilet seat” that could diagnose congestive heart failure. Now scientists at Stanford University have put diagnostic tools in the toilet itself.

Medical Notes: Week of April 26, 2020

Medical Notes: Week of April 26, 2020

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of April 26, 2020 including: A blood test for many types of cancer has been a long-sought goal of researchers, and now they’re much closer. Then, a team of faculty and students at Rice University has developed an automated bag valve mask ventilator using $300 worth of parts off the shelf. And finally, a study from the University of Michigan finds that if you talk to yourself in the third person by name, you’ll be less likely to cave in to tempting foods.

Medical Notes: Week of April 19, 2020

Medical Notes: Week of April 19, 2020

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of April 19, 2020 including: If you’ve been taking the drug Ranitidine for reflux or ulcer prevention, the FDA says stop. Then, a new study shows that parents are yelling at their children more since most of us have been ordered to stay home. And finally, with COVID-19 testing in such short supply… why not let a dog do it?

Medical Notes: Week of April 12, 2020

Medical Notes: Week of April 12, 2020

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of April 12, 2020 including: A study that says taking large amounts of Ibuprofen may be worse for your liver than we thought. Then, a new study finds that there’s no harm in letting your baby "Cry it out." Then, hearing aids that help improve the thinking ability of those with hearing loss. Then, scientists have come up with a new way to deliver vaccines without getting a shot. And finally… A study showing Americans are washing their hands more often these days… and taking evasive action by using paper towels to open door handles.

Medical Notes: Week of March 29, 2020

Medical Notes: Week of March 29, 2020

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of March 29, 2020, including: A treatment combining radiation and chemotherapy could be much more effective for colorectal cancer. Then, scientists have discovered that a World War One helmet is actually better when it comes to protecting its wearers from shock waves. And finally, doctors can tell whether you’re rich or poor through urinalysis.