Hospital Price Transparency

Hospital Price Transparency

Hospitals are now required to post prices for many procedures on their websites, including cash prices and what insurers pay. The intent of the federal rule is to allow patients to shop around, putting pressure on hospitals to compete on price. However, many hospitals have yet to follow the rule. Experts discuss the rule, its likely outcome, and how patients can use it to their advantage.

Sometimes Not Man’s Best Friend: Dog Bites

Sometimes Not Man’s Best Friend: Dog Bites

Nearly 40 percent of American homes have a dog, and while dogs may be “man’s best friend,” sometimes they bite, and sometimes with serious consequences. An expert who has studied dog bites discusses the reality of breed temperament, especially when children are around, how to prevent bites, and whether breeds with dangerous reputations deserve them.

Medical Notes: Week of August 1, 2021

Medical Notes: Week of August 1, 2021

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of August 1, 2021 including: A study confirms that just one night sleeping impacts your mental and physical well being. Then, some researchers are concerned that in-vitro fertilization may disturb the genetics of embryos. Then, If you’ve got allergies and suspect they’re worse than they used to be… you’re right. And finally… experts have been concerned that Americans have a poor work-life balance, made even worse by the pandemic.

We Are Not Ok

We Are Not OK

Where COVID-19 vaccination is high, it’s a getting-back-to-normal world after the pandemic. But even some vaccinated people won’t return to normal for months or years because of the psychological effects. Experts discuss why this occurs and how people can help themselves return to mental health.

Injuries In Senior Citizens

Injuries In Senior Citizens

A new study shows that people over age 70 are three times more likely than younger people to die when they fall. Older people also take more medications with a fall risk, and which pose a risk themselves when someone taking them falls. Experts discuss these complications and why it’s important to prevent falls and other injuries.

Medical Notes: Week of July 25, 2021

Medical Notes: Week of July 25, 2021

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of July 25, 2021 including: A big majority of the US workforce wants to know if their co-workers are vaccinated against Covid… but they don’t want to reveal if they’ve gotten the vaccine themselves. Then, if young adults get COVID-19, they may recover… but end up exhausted. And finally… researchers have found another risk factor for dementia—tooth loss.

Advances Against Lung Cancer

Advances Against Lung Cancer

More people die of lung cancer than breast, prostate, and colon cancer combined. A decade ago, a lung cancer diagnosis was often a death sentence. But now treatments are being developed that mean it can often be treated, especially if screening detects it early. A patient/advocate and researcher discuss.

Poor & Rural Kids In Crisis

Poor And Rural Kids In Crisis

A study by Save the Children shows on a county-by-county basis that children in poor and rural counties, especially in the south, are much less likely to survive into adulthood, and when they do, they’re often forced to become adults too soon by poverty, pregnancy, and lack of education. A Save the Children expert discusses factors that hurt children and ways they might be alleviated.

Medical Notes: Week of July 18, 2021

Medical Notes: Week of July 18, 2021

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of July 18, 2021 including: Everybody loves a home-cooked meal, but what if your stove was slowly poisoning you? Then, if you were born 200 years ago, you’d be lucky to celebrate your 40th birthday. Since then, the average human life expectancy has increased dramatically. Then, Researchers have cured diabetes in mice by putting insulin-producing cells into a tiny device. Then, Older people who have trouble falling asleep are more likely to have cognitive troubles later. Then, a study showing that smartphones should have a bedtime too. And finally, 25 percent of adults say they simply don’t want children… and they’re perfectly happy.

How To Speed Up Your Drive: Don’t Turn Left

How To Speed Up Your Drive: Don’t Turn Left

Traffic engineers are learning that they can increase road efficiency and safety by eliminating left turns at many busy intersections, even those that have left turn arrows. This increases distance traveled for some people--some may have to make three right turns instead--but virtually everyone benefits in travel time, as package carrier UPS has learned. A traffic engineer and UPS official discuss how it could work.

Rethinking Dementia

Rethinking Dementia

Dementia has a much wider range than most people think, and people with dementia are usually functional for years. An expert discusses the course of the disease and how life can still be positive for years before it reaches the late, debilitating stage most people think of when they hear the word “dementia.”

Medical Notes: Week of July 11, 2021

Medical Notes: Week of July 11, 2021

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of July 11, 2021 including: Officials are worried we may start seeing a spike in COVID cases soon and it could become serious by fall. Then, Have you lost your sense of smell? COVID may not be to blame--it could be air pollution. Then, doctors can now use smartphone cameras to detect bacteria on the skin and in the mouth. And finally, for people suffering from hard-to-treat depression, new research suggests a non-traditional treatment method - laughing gas.

When Law Enforcement and Trauma Care Collide

When Law Enforcement and Trauma Care Collide

Many patients arrive in the emergency room as a result of violence or car crashes—events in which police have an investigative interest. Sometimes, police needs clash with trauma care, and priorities are hashed out case by case. Experts discuss which priorities come first and when, and the procedures needed to smooth out sometimes contentious interaction.

The Psychology of Procrastination

The Psychology of Procrastination

Most people procrastinate at least now and then. But when we put something off, we’re usually facing not a time management problem, but an emotion management problem. Experts discuss what’s going on in our heads when we procrastinate.

Medical Notes: Week of July 4, 2021

Medical Notes: Week of July 4, 2021

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of July 4, 2021 including: A study shows that even a mild case of COVID produces antibodies that are still going strong 11 months later. Then, Could flickering lights help treat Alzheimer’s disease? And finally a new study shows that the flavor ban in San Francisco may have pushed high schoolers to start smoking cigarettes instead.