SUDC — Sudden Unexplained Death Of A Child

SUDC — Sudden Unexplained Death Of A Child

Each year, some 400 US children over age 1, most of them toddlers, die overnight for no known reason. Families, longing for answers, often find that their families, friends, and even pediatricians are unfamiliar with this classification of death, or that they even occur. Family members who have lost a child, a medical examiner, and a research expert who has lost a child discuss SUDC.

Tonsil Stones

Tonsil Stones

Some people find that small “stones” are growing on their tonsils. They’re an accumulation of skin cells, food, and other debris. While they are not medically dangerous or painful, they often produce bad breath or sometimes pain. Two expert physicians discuss tonsil stones’ formation and treatment.

Medical Notes: Week of June 20, 2021

Medical Notes: Week of June 20, 2021

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of June 20, 2021 including: A new study finds that organic meats are much less likely to be contaminated with foodborne pathogens. Then, fracking has been linked to higher heart attack rates in nearby communities. Then, more people are working the graveyard shift… and that means more people suffering from what’s called “shift work sleep disorder.” Then, here’s another way to cut your cancer risk—eat more mushrooms. And finally, can cannabis relieve chronic itch?

How Covid Masks Have Affected Children’s Language Development

How Covid Masks Have Affected Children’s Language Development

Infants, toddlers, and grade school children use many cues to learn language. Some of them are visual, involving seeing the mouth move. Some depend on clearly hearing speech. Both have been impacted by mask wearing during the pandemic. Experts now studying how far behind children are as a result discuss how language develops in children and how it’s been affected in the pandemic.

Refineries And Their Neighbors: How Safe Is The Air?

Refineries And Their Neighbors: How Safe Is The Air?

A recent report shows that more than a dozen refineries around the US are emitting benzene pollution into the air at higher levels than allowed by the EPA. An activist discusses this newly labeled problem and what the agency can do to curb it.

Medical Notes: Week of June 13, 2021

Medical Notes: Week of June 13, 2021

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of June 13, 2021 including: Pregnant women face many medical risks, but a study suggests a case of symptomatic COVID-19 can make birth even riskier. Then, a new drug combination looks promising to treat Lou Gehrig's Disease. Then, doctors say you may want to reconsider using an over-the-counter antibiotic next time you scrape a knee. And finally… your chicken dinners aren’t saving any cows.

Undiagnosed Mystery Diseases

Undiagnosed Mystery Diseases

Hundreds of patients nationally have diseases that have confounded doctors and yielded no diagnosis and no reliable treatment. Today the Undiagnosed Diseases Network, founded and funded by the NIH, helps these patients, but its funding is uncertain beyond 2022. Patients and a physician leader of the UDN discuss the lonely plight of these patients and the hope UDN provides.

Tasty Food vs. Healthy Food: Finding A Balance

Tasty Food vs. Healthy Food: Finding A Balance

Many Americans believe that healthy food doesn’t taste good, and tasty food isn’t healthy. A chef who is also a cardiologist discusses how to find a balance by seeking out healthy ingredients rather than whole categories of foods.

Medical Notes: Week of June 6, 2021

Medical Notes: Week of June 6, 2021

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of June 6, 2021 including: Scientists have come up with a test that can tell in less than an hour whether you’re sick with a virus or bacteria. Then a study finds that there are changes in the blood that can predict a pregnant woman's due date more accurately than today's obstetricians. Then, more evidence that Covid symptoms can drag on and on for months. And finally, the impact of COVID-19 may be felt on the environment for centuries to come as discarded masks and gloves have already been washing up in remote places.