Missing The Goal Of Herd Immunity

Missing the Goal of Herd Immunity

Since the Covid-19 pandemic began, public health experts have looked to vaccines with the goal of creating “herd immunity,” where so many people are vaccinated that the virus stalls out. Now it is clear we will not reach that goal, meaning the threat of the pandemic may drag on for years. One of the nation’s leading infectious disease experts discusses how we are missing the target and what it means.

Clinical Trials And Trust In Underserved Communities

Clinical Trials And Trust In Underserved Communities

People of color are less likely than others to receive timely treatment for medical issues. This is reflected in Covid-19 vaccination numbers, in cancer treatment, and in clinical trial participation. Experts discuss ways to increase participation, especially in clinical trials that might ultimately raise trust in medicine.

Medical Notes: Week of May 30, 2021

Medical Notes: Week of May 30, 2021

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of May 30, 2021 including: A large new study shows people are in more pain than ever before. Then, one of the hallmarks of diseases like Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and ALS is a misfolding of proteins. now researchers say those folded proteins may be linked to gut bacteria. And finally, a study showing that air pollution from farms contributes to nearly 18,000 deaths per year.

Keeping Generic Drugs Safe

Keeping Generic Drugs Safe

Since the 1980’s, almost all production of generic drugs has moved overseas, where FDA inspectors have a much tougher time making sure they’re following rules for safety. An investigative journalist describes the ways she’s found that many drugmakers cut corners, putting safety at risk, and details what consumers can do to protect themselves.

Covid And Kidney Disease

Covid And Kidney Disease

Covid-19 is usually a respiratory disease, but it can affect virtually any organ in the body. The nation’s top kidney disease expert discusses how Covid can prompt life-threatening kidney effects in the previously healthy, and how those with kidney disease are more susceptible to severe Covid infection.

Medical Notes: Week of May 23, 2021

Medical Notes: Week of May 23, 2021

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of May 23, 2021 including: The stress of the pandemic on healthcare workers has been enormous, but a new study shows critical care nurses were already burning out in large numbers even before it hit. Then, more than half of all cases of cervical cancer in the United States occur in women who’ve never had a pap smear or HPV test. Then, a study finds cocoa powder may reduce liver disease. And finally, moms who’ve been working at home during the pandemic won’t be surprised to hear this—they’re shouldering a lot more of the household chores and childcare than dads who are also working at home.

The Covid Baby Bust

The Covid Baby Bust

The US birth rate has been declining since the Crash of 2008, but it took an even larger decline during the pandemic to levels unseen since the Great Depression. Today fertility rates are below replacement levels, which could have big impacts on education, employment, and the tax base years down the road. Experts discuss how people make fertility decisions and the impacts they can have on the nation.

The Changing Face Of Colon Cancer

The Changing Face Of Colon Cancer

Colon cancer is striking much younger people than it used to, leading experts to lower the age on screening recommendations. A noted colon surgeon discusses screening and treatment options, and the way COVID-19 has changed patients’ approach to getting screened.

Medical Notes: Week of May 16, 2021

Medical Notes: Week of May 16, 2021

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of May 16, 2021 including: A study showing that even Covid survivors who were never sick enough to be hospitalized have a 60 percent higher risk of death from other diseases. Then Most people assume that smoke from wildfires affects mostly the heart and lungs, but a new study finds that it increases the odds of eczema as well. And finally… more than a year after the first reports of “zoom fatigue,” we’re getting more insight on who’s most affected and why.

The Distorted Smells Of Covid-19

The Distorted Smells Of Covid-19

Many of those who’ve had COVID-19 have suffered from a temporary loss of their sense of smell, but some have had what seems to be an even worse symptom weeks or months later—a distorted sense of smell, where everything, from coffee to flowers, smells sickeningly awful. An expert and a former sufferer discuss how disruptive to life this can be and what people can do to make it through to recovery.

Research Ethics Now Vs. Then: A Case Study

Research Ethics Now Vs. Then: A Case Study

In the mid-1960’s, many Ivy League and Seven Sister colleges as well as prestigious prep schools allowed researchers to photograph incoming students naked as part of work on a now-discredited theory linking physical characteristics to leadership potential. A former student who went through it, now a physician and writer, discusses how research ethics have changed in the last 50 years.

Medical Notes: Week of May 9, 2021

Medical Notes: Week of May 9, 2021

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of May 9, 2021 including: The injection of nanoparticles deep into the brain can produce relief for those with chronic pain and depression. Then, diagnoses for the four most common cancers take a big jump when people hit age 65. And finally, a new study shows that narcissistic people pump themselves up only because deep down inside, they don’t believe they’re any good.

Bottled Water And Trust In Our Institutions

Bottled Water And Trust In Our Institutions

Bottled water sales have skyrocketed, in part because many people believe it is safer than tap water. Actually, bottled water faces few of the safety regulations that tap water does. The disconnect, according to a new study, comes from society’s pervasive distrust in all governmental institutions. The lead researcher discusses how restoring faith in water could begin to restore faith in all American institutions.

Covid And PTSD

Covid And PTSD

Studies show that as many as a third of people who were very ill with COVID-19 later develop PTSD. Caregivers and health care workers may be afflicted as well. An expert discusses how this develops and what people can do to get better.

Medical Notes: Week of May 2, 2021

Medical Notes: Week of May 2, 2021

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of May 2, 2021 including: Doctors are preparing for the possibility of COVID-19 variants that vaccines don’t prevent. Then, a new drug that shows promise against Pancreatic and triple-negative breast cancers. And finally… mindfulness and meditation apps are good for reducing stress and anxiety, but they can also make you selfish.