How High Drug Prices Lead To Drug Misuse

Millions of Americans cannot afford the medications they’ve been prescribed. Many skip doses, split pills or don’t fill prescriptions at all as a result, with sometimes even fatal consequences. But doctors are often unable to consider cost very well in prescribing, as the same drug often costs patients vastly different amounts due to insurance differences. Experts discuss the problem and what patients can do to save.

Brain Aneurysm Through the Eyes of a Survivor

Brain Aneurysm Through the Eyes of a Survivor

Brain aneurysms—bulging in a brain blood vessel, like an inflated balloon—affect 1 in 50 people and are generally without symptoms until they burst. This occurs in about 30,000 people per year in the US, accounting for 3-5 percent of all new strokes. Here is the story of one survivor in her own words.

Medical Notes: Week of April 25, 2021

Medical Notes: Week of April 25, 2021

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of April 25, 2021 including: New research shows that reopening schools can be safe. Then, The brain cancer glioblastoma has no cure… but that may be changing. And finally, as air pollution from cars declines, scientists in Los Angeles say another polluter is becoming more important—palm trees.

Tracing COVID In Animals & Water

Tracing COVID In Animals & Water

Scientists are testing hundreds of different kinds of animals as well as waste and storm water for COVID-19, looking for reservoirs for possible mutation. They’ve learned even pets can possibly harbor the virus but probably aren’t a threat. An expert discusses how the knowledge will combat COVID variants.

Giving Cash To The Homeless

Giving Cash To The Homeless

Homelessness continues to be a stubborn problem despite many well-intentioned programs. A new experimental study finds that giving homeless people thousands of dollars in cash helps get many of them off the streets for good, calling into question many assumptions about the homeless and how they got that way. Experts discuss the new program and its implications for ending homelessness.

Medical Notes: Week of April 18, 2021

Medical Notes: Week of April 18, 2021

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of April 18, 2021 including: A new study finds COVID-19 was likely circulating undetected for nearly two months before late December 2019. Then, a study indicating weight loss surgery significantly cuts the risk of cancer in people with severe obesity and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. And finally, a small study finds that early in the lockdown, a weight gain of two pounds a month was pretty typical.

The Pandemic In Historical Perspective

The Pandemic in Historical Perspective

Plagues such as COVID-19 are nothing new, and this pandemic is far from the worst the world has ever faced. A physician and historian examines COVID in comparison to other pandemics and discusses the lessons that will serve us well in the future. 

Surviving An Active Shooter

Surviving An Active Shooter

Two experts discuss the changing theory of how to survive an active shooter incident through what’s called “run, hide, and fight."

Medical Notes: Week of April 11, 2021

Medical Notes: Week of April 11, 2021

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of April 11, 2021 including: A federal task force says far more smokers and former smokers should be eligible for free CT scans to screen for lung cancer. Then, a single head injury could result in dementia decades later. Then, Women with heart disease do a lot better when they’re treated by women doctors. And finally, if you want to cut your risk of diabetes… eat breakfast early.

The Benefits of Handwriting

Today’s students often type their assignments, no matter the grade level. Writing by hand is done less frequently, and some students are barely able to produce cursive writing. However, studies show that writing by hand creates a better connection to the brain for learning content. Experts discuss how we might tap this connection in an increasingly tech world.

Assessing the Psychological Wreckage of the Pandemic

Many people are relieved that, thanks to vaccines, the COVID-19 pandemic seems to be waning. But the mental health wreckage of the last year will take longer to overcome. Experts discuss how it’s showing up and what people can do to get back on track.  

Medical Notes: Week of April 4, 2021

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of April 4, 2021 including: One of the oldest drugs in the world, aspirin, may help prevent COVID-19 infections and make illnesses that do take place much less serious. Then, people with Crohn’s disease often have flare-ups. One reason those sores don’t heal—fungus in foods. And finally… bosses who demand that employees keep their noses to the grindstone may be hurting productivity.