Covid Update: Infectious New Variant & Stretching The Vaccine

Covid Update: Infectious New Variant & Stretching The Vaccine

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention predicts that a new, more contagious version of COVID-19 will become the predominant strain by March, testing the new vaccine’s effectiveness. At the same time, researchers are trying to find ways to get the vaccine to more people more quickly by lengthening time between doses, with unknown results. Infectious disease experts discuss where we are in the fight.

Preventing Food Waste

Preventing Food Waste

During the Super Bowl, leftovers from gatherings—even small ones--may threaten to take over the refrigerator. An expert discusses consumer-friendly how-to’s, including how to read labels, that can lengthen food life and help avoid food waste.

Living Too Clean During Covid

Living Too Clean During Covid

The COVID pandemic has prompted people to clean and disinfect more than ever. However, experts believe that humans need a certain amount of germs for our immune systems to work properly. One expert discusses her concern that we’re living too clean in the pandemic, and how we can benefit from “good bugs” without danger from the bad ones.

Fibbing To Your Doctor

Fibbing To Your Doctor

Surveys show that as many as 80 percent of people omit information, stretch the truth or outright lie to their doctors. Experts discuss why it happens, consequences, and methods that might reduce the amount of less-than-truthful answers to doctors’ questions.

Medical Notes: Week of January 24, 2021

Medical Notes: Week of January 24, 2021

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of January 24, 2021 including: A study finding that 60 percent of all cases of COVID-19 are spread by people who have no symptoms. Then, children under age two may suffer effects from antibiotics later in childhood. And finally, new recommendations suggesting kids under age two should have no added sugar in their diet.

What Determines Our Food Preferences?

What Determines Our Food Preferences?

Scientists are discovering that our food preferences are much more than a matter of taste, and that taste itself is more complicated than we thought. Psychology also plays a role. An expert discusses what determines preferences, such as why some people like jalapeno peppers & black coffee, and some don’t.

Requiring Employees To Get Covid Vaccines

Requiring Employees To Get Covid Vaccines

Some Americans say there is no way they’ll get a COVID-19 vaccine, yet some may have no choice if they want to keep their jobs. Law allows workplaces to require safety-related vaccines for workers. Businesses may even begin to require proof of vaccination among customers to maintain safe environments. An expert on health law discusses.

Medical Notes: Week of January 17, 2021

Medical Notes: Week of January 17, 2021

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of January 17, 2021 including: Glaucoma is the world’s number one cause of blindness … and those daily eye drops are not always successful. Then, the number of times a woman has given birth affects how quickly she ages. Then You can expect another decline in Covid-19 transmission as we head into spring, and finally, if you want to make shots hurt less… make the right kind of face.

Overcoming Black Distrust In The Covid Vaccine

Overcoming Black Distrust In The Covid Vaccine

Success of COVID-19 vaccines depends on about 75 percent of people getting them, but distrust of medicine and of vaccines among African-Americans means they may not come close to that milepost. Two experts discuss historical reasons for distrust, how the system will have to come through in ways it has not in the past, and how community leaders will make a huge difference in how the new vaccines are accepted.

Smart Cars And Smart Roads

Smart Cars And Smart Roads

Cars will soon be able to provide data as well as receive it. Experts explain how cars can talk with roads, traffic signals and central computers, and how roads themselves may collect data on the cars they carry. In the future, autonomous cars may use these links to greatly speed travel and make it much safer.

Medical Notes: Week of January 10, 2021

Medical Notes: Week of January 10, 2021

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of January 10, 2021 including: Doctors consider people at high risk for a stroke if they have medical conditions like diabetes or high blood pressure. But maybe they should consider whether they’re depressed as well. Then, children under age two may suffer effects from antibiotics later on in childhood. And finally, mom may have always told you to eat your vegetables… but a little meat and dairy keep people from breaking bones.

Childhood Trauma, Later Disease

Childhood Trauma, Later Disease

Researchers have found that severe emotional trauma in childhood triggers physical disease later in life, and has a cumulative effect. An award-winning science writer who has researched the topic discusses findings.

Covid Messaging: Why Communication Is Life And Death

Covid Messaging: Why Communication is Life and Death

Poor communication and mixed messages have contributed greatly to poor acceptance of anti-coronavirus actions such as masking and social distancing, and experts fear it may be the same with the new vaccines. Experts discuss what we’ve done right in messaging and the lessons from what we’ve done wrong.

Medical Notes: Week of January 3, 2021

Medical Notes: Week of January 3, 2021

A look at the top medical headlines for the week of January 3, 2021 including: The incidence of cancer is increasing among teenagers and young adults. Then, This is the time to make new year’s resolutions… but mental health experts say this year may not be the time to make big changes. And finally… your Roomba may be spying on you through your wi-fi network.