“A lot of people are on the keto diet these days, but a new study suggests that if you are, don’t take a “cheat day.” A study in the journal Nutrients shows that people who’ve been on a high fat, low carb diet can damage their blood vessels with a big sugar spike equivalent to one large bottle of soda.



Medical notes this week…

If you like to eat red meat, a new major review of the evidence says, “Go ahead.” The study in the Annals of Internal Medicine finds that cutting back on red meat and processed meat in the diet has little impact on health and results in no significant reduction in the risk of heart disease, diabetes or cancer. Already a number of large health organizations have trashed the study, which goes against years of advice to cut down on meat and eat more veggies. But authors say their conclusions are based on the most comprehensive review of the evidence ever made.

The PSA test for prostate specific antigen is the closest thing doctors have to a screening test for prostate cancer, but it often produces false positives leading to risky and unnecessary biopsies. Now a study in the journal Neoplasia finds that a urine test for a genetic biomarker can accurately detect one form of prostate cancer affecting about a third of men with cancer. The test would have to be used in conjunction with tests for other cancer biomarkers.

A lot of people are on the keto diet these days, but a new study suggests that if you are, don’t take a “cheat day.” A study in the journal Nutrients shows that people who’ve been on a high fat, low carb diet can damage their blood vessels with a big sugar spike equivalent to one large bottle of soda. The study was small, with only nine subjects, but researchers say the results were still alarming. 

And finally, you may think your cat doesn’t care when you come home from work. But a new study shows they probably do, just as much as dogs. The study in the journal Current Biology finds that about 65 percent of cats form what are called “secure bonds” with their people, which is, surprisingly, about the same rate that human infants are attached to their caregivers.


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